PhD Research

I joined Keele in 2012 as an undergraduate in English and American Literature, where I obtained a First Class Honours and was awarded the King Alfred Prize in Medieval English and the Clare Coleman Memorial Prize for special achievement in my studies. I stayed on at Keele in 2015–16, where I achieved a scholarship (£10,000) to enrol on a Masters in English Literature (Distinction). In 2017, I embarked on my PhD studies in English Literature. My doctoral research is generously supported by a faculty-funded Graduate Teaching Assistantship and funding from the David Bruce Centre for American Studies.

My research interests focus on US literature and culture, especially experimental writing movements. I am writing a PhD thesis on formal experimentation and queer feminist activism in experimental writing published since 2001. Through this research, I aim to demonstrate that formal experimentation serves pedagogical and political functions when enacted by queer feminist writers.

I have also conducted research on the poetry of Ely Shipley. My Masters dissertation argued that poetry provides Shipley a means of subverting oppressive narratives of marginalised (trans)gender identities, thus contributing to the construction of identity based on self-definition and lived experience. I have gone on to publish a chapter from this dissertation as a journal article. This article argues that Shipley uses poetry as both a reflection of and on contemporary US culture and its policing of gendered bodies, especially under the current Trump administration. My interest in LGBTIQ re-presentation and queer poetics continues in my current research, which focuses on the experimental writing of several LGBTIQ poets.

I have delivered several talks based on my research across the UK since 2017 and have a forthcoming book chapter on Dodie Bellamy's queer poetics in The Routledge Companion to Gender, Sexuality, and Culture (edited by Professor Emma Rees).

 

Please see my CV for a full list of my publications and talks.

Collage precisely references the spaces in between and refuses to respect the boundaries that usually delineate self from other, art object from museum, and the copy from the original. In this respect, as well as in many others, collage [...] seems feminist and queer.

~ Jack Halberstam, The Queer Art of Failure 

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Schnitt mit dem Küchenmesser Dada durch die letzte weimarer Bierbauchkulturepoche Deutschland (1919), Hannah Höch